The Oxford Guide - Differences between Version 15 and Version 14 of Christ Church Picture Gallery

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The current exhibition is 'After Michelangelo' 16 February - 16 May 2010. Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475 1564) is regarded as one of the most influential artists of all times. His fresco of the 'Last Judgement' in the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican is the most replicated work of art. Artists from Raphael to Tintoretto copied his works in order to further their own artistic ideas. This exhibition brings together thirty-three drawings from the Christ Church collection of Old Masters to trace and understand Michelangelo’s genius through his followers, imitators and admirers

The current exhibition is 'The Poetry of draped Figures' (2nd November 2009 7th February 2010). How drapery and clothes enrobe the human figure and how to depict the varied qualities of material was and remains one of the challenges in art. With more than thirty old master drawings this exhibition will explore a seemingly mundane topic and will illustrate its richness and creative power. Works on display include an early sheet (c. 1400) with column-like, cloaked figures, Leonardo da Vinci’s Study of a Sleeve and drapery studies by Figino, one of Leonardo’s followers. Despite their practical qualities all the drawings - in their rendering of the folds, play with light and shade and lines that follow or defeat the imagined body underneath - can equally be regarded as abstract poetic forms.

Christ Church is unique among the Oxford and Cambridge colleges in possessing an important collection of Old Master paintings and drawings, housed in a purpose-built Gallery of considerable architectural interest in itself.

The collection consists of some 300 paintings and almost 2000 drawings and is strongest in Italian art from the 14th to the 18th century.

The internationally renowned drawings collection in the Picture Gallery at Christ Church is regarded as one of the most important private collections of Old Master drawings in the country. These small in-house exhibitions are changed about every three months to enable the public to see a varied selection from this part of the collection.

The current exhibition is 'The Poetry of draped Figures' (2nd November 2009 – 7th February 2010). How drapery and clothes enrobe the human figure and how to depict the varied qualities of material was and remains one of the challenges in art. With more than thirty old master drawings this exhibition will explore a seemingly mundane topic and will illustrate its richness and creative power. Works on display include an early sheet (c. 1400) with column-like, cloaked figures, Leonardo da Vinci’s Study of a Sleeve and drapery studies by Figino, one of Leonardo’s followers. Despite their practical qualities all the drawings - in their rendering of the folds, play with light and shade and lines that follow or defeat the imagined body underneath - can equally be regarded as abstract poetic forms.

Admission: £3/£2. Free to those who have Bod cards.


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